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Sanusi Lamido Sanusi II : The Last Emir of a Once United Kano Emirate

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Despite the fact that Emir Sanusi was caught in the web of his own contradictions. His emergence and eventual dethronement as Emir of Kano was one of those circumstances where fate and politics crossed each other’s path at the wrong point in history.

Looking at a man who invested ₦200million to purchase over 40,000 books and journals catalogued in his library shows the level of education, exposure and temperament he presides with over the 21st century nation-state but he chose to become an Emir whose authority and influence are largely symbolic and ceremonial.

Ever since his ascension to the throne, the stage was set for such implacable ending. This is because, the type of public role he envisioned and struggled to carve for himself was incompatible with royal life. This also includes his nostalgic decision to model his reign after the order of his grandfather, adopting the name and style of the latter which lead him to this fate.

Also Read: The Dethroned Emir of Kano Gets New Appointment in Kaduna State

Emir Sanusi’s collision with political power was actually inevitable which was why he was queried twice over disagreements with the state government in the few months he spent as Emir with Kwankwaso as Governor. It is obvious that Emir Sanusi’s biggest contradiction is his attempt to cast himself as a royal revolutionary, an activist Emir that is far ahead of his time

However, revolution and royalty don’t mix- it only explodes with the bearer. All over the world, even in constitutional monarchies, royals are expected to lead a life of relative quietude and discretion. To Emir Sanusi, he became an activist Emir who is not hindered by the traditional gag of the Amawali. The people are accustomed to seeing their Emirs rather than hearing them.

In spite of those contradictions, Emir Sanusi occupies a higher moral pedestal than his ‘dethroners’ will ever dream of. And above all, his vision of the society closely aligns with mine, and with that of all lovers of National Progress.

When he chose to speak the truth, I believe Emir Sanusi was fully aware of the potential consequences of his choices and actions. He was willing to pay the ultimate price; I guess he told after the fate of his grandfather. Even in the last few weeks of his reign when the reality of his dethronment began to manifest as Ganduje’s schemes appear unrelenting, he carried on with a sense of divine resignation. 

More disturbing was the manner Ganduje went about his misadventures, by first balkanizing the Emirate into five smaller emirates and significantly eroding its royal reputation. The fact that any politician in power could depose a first-class Emir and disfigure a historic emirate with such ease and arbitrariness should send shivers down the spine of every northern royal. By that singular action, Ganduje delivered a blow from which the emirate will never fully recover.

Ganduje couldn’t have attempted or succeeded in this without the active connivance of rival members of the Kano royal family. Both sides of the royal family have their fair share of blame in this crisis, for allowing themselves to become willing tools at the hands of politicians. At the end, with the splitting of the emirate into 5 smaller emirates, they ended up losing the very emirate they were fighting so hard to rule.

For Emir Sanusi, this is obviously the beginning of another interesting chapter. Because even outside emirateship, Emir Sanusi will continue to divide opinions along very sharp lines. Many people see the Emir as a symbol of reform in a region wallowing in the abyss of poverty and underdevelopment. His supporters see him as a royal eccentric and reformer, who is out to redefine Emirship in the 21st century.

Caught in a web he could not break from, Emir Sanusi’s reign has ended before it started through politics. He paid a huge price as a royal revolutionary. If it were in the past when emirs had real power, he will make a great emir given his erudition and the visionary prowess to roll out reforms that are capable of pushing his backward subjects forward. But today, the reality is quite different, and he will be remembered more for his glittering reign than for his role in the history of Kano.

Even as the throne is taken away from him, Emir Sanusi’s reaction to his dethronment has become a royal class act that’s reserved for the history books. His manner of acknowledging his deposition letter and his video address to the people accepting his dethronment and calling for calm demonstrate. Those pristine qualities that transcends the realm of Emiral power is Emir Sanusi’s biggest victory as the Last Emir of a once united Kano Emirate.

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Economy

Twitter makes Ghana its headquarters in Africa, Nigerians React

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Twitter makes Ghana its headquarters in Africa, Nigerians React

Twitter announced today that the company is now in Africa, with its headquarters in Ghana.

“Twitter is now present on the continent. Thank you Ghana and @NakufoAddo,” Twitter CEO, Jack Dorsey tweeted today, April 12.

Abubakar Suleiman, the CEO of Sterling Bank, has weighed in on the conversation about Twitter making Ghana its headquarters in African.

Nigerians reacted to the fact that Ghana, and not Nigeria, was chosen to be the headquarters.

Then Suleiman tweeted: “First you tell the world Nigeria is a zoo.. Then you hear @TwitterSF has chosen @GhanaPresidency as their WA headquarters & you are wondering why.

ALSO READ;

“If you can’t sell yourself, nobody will buy you. Nigeria remains the heartbeat of Africa, our current struggles notwithstanding.”

Bank CEO, Abubakar Suleiman blames Nigerians who bad-mouth the country for Twitter’s decision to make Ghana its headquarters in Africa

See Nigerians Reactions Below;

A number of his followers took to the comments to disagree with him and he doubled down, writing: “I think everyone sells. And we should showcase the good things in our country even as we critic the shortcomings..”

 

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John Magufuli’s Death: The lessons for Nigerian leaders

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JOHN Magufuli, president of Tanzania died a few weeks ago and it is taking the whole of Africa a long time to come to grips with his death.

It is like a bad dream; many of us are yet to come to terms that he died of natural causes.

Here was a man who was full of life, executing his duties with zeal and passion, taking on the super powers in all ramifications, suddenly going down with a strange illness that finally consumed him.


The establishment people among us will say that this is natural, but for a man that had his private physician at his beck and call, such sudden heart attacks are not normal, unless there were inherent or prevailing ailments which were not made known to the public.

In this day and age, when peopled can be killed without trace of the murder weapon, the death of Magufuli will remain a mystery. We have seen the elimination of progressive African leaders in the past and this one will rank as one of them.

Before now there were Sylvanus Olympio 1963, Thomas Sankara 1987, Patrice Lumumba of Congo, Amilcar Cabral of Guinea-Bissau and many others too numerous to mention here.


The purpose of this piece is to highlight the impact Magufuli was able to make within a few years in power.

It is my humble opinion that if African leaders can replicate his methodology, it will not be long before our long-expected economic liberation will be accomplished.

This was a man who went into government with clear-cut ideas about what to do. According to Professor P.L.O. Lumumba, “politics is the competition of ideas”.

In this case, ideas that can be put into practice to move society forward. Ideas are not static or permanent, they are subject to vagaries and dynamics of life; that is why the late President Julius Nyerere of Tanzania said: “When you make mistakes, you can correct them”; an idea that is no longer relevant to the growth of society, should not be encouraged by anyone in position of leadership.

When you are in position of leadership and you are not governed by relevant ideas, you tend to go round in circles and in the short run, your failure will be exposed to the world.

This is a man who came to power as President of Tanzania, barely a year after our own Muhammadu Buhari was sworn in as Nigerian president.

But five years after, what can we say about our situation in Nigeria and what can we tell about Tanzania?

In this period, Magufuli was able to bring his country’s economy from the bottom to a middle income economy, while that of Nigeria went into recession several times and indeed, lost its position as the biggest economy in Africa.

Not only that, Nigeria was able to firmly establish itself as the country with the highest number of poor people in the world.


The difference is very clear, but some of us will always come out to defend this position with the fact that Nigeria is not Tanzania and begin to give excuses on why this is so.

A leadership that focuses on excuses will never get things done, because it loses direction and offers faults instead of solutions.

When you have a mandate deprived of excuses, you will come up with solutions, no matter the situation and the interesting thing about this is that, the solutions will be local.

Let us, for example, note how Magufuli moved his nation from economic doldrums just by applying home- grown solutions.


He came up with a policy that makes it compulsory for all minerals extracted in the land to be used as raw materials in local manufacturing. Raw materials can only be taken out of the country on the express permission of the Predidency.

And, to give bite to this law, raw materials billed for export were impounded at the port of Dar es Salaam and the whole world took notice.

If this law is enacted in Nigeria and faithfully applied, there is no way we would be importing petroleum products into this country because we have the raw materials and the capacity, but lack the political will to execute such policy.

If we want to run the NNPC mainly on the basis of merit, this position can be accomplished in less than two years; but do we have the will?


When you site the refineries at the point of drilling the oil, why would you have crude oil pipeline sabotage? Magufuli banned foreign trips for his government officials and used the proposed money to rehabilitate the health sector.

He abolished tax exemptions for ministers; but, here in Nigeria, how do our government appointees behave? With over bloated numbers of aides, fleet of cars in garages, all at government expenses, how do you expect government to be productive?

People say that President Buhari is not after wealth, that he has always lived frugally; but, as President of Nigeria since 2015, we have not seen such display of frugality in spending at the presidential level, and this had emboldened the National Assembly leadership to toe in his steps.

Imagine if government decides to cut drastically on its spending, what benefit that will bring to the country’s economy? Magufuli fined illegal miners to the tune of 193 million Tanzanian shillings for under-valuing Tanzania gold export and seized 250 containers at the port. The British- owned company was forced to give away 16 percent shares of the company to the government of Tanzania.


In Nigeria, everyone is depending on Niger Delta oil, while foreign elements and greedy Nigerians collaborate to export valuable raw materials out of the country, with government officials and security agencies looking the other way.

These raw materials are what Magufuli used to build the Tanzania economy.

In Nigeria, we allow foreigners and bandits to take control of the business; meanwhile, the states are unable to pay the minimum wage for workers.

We have raw materials in abundance: gold, tin, copper, bauxite, silver, steel and so many more, waiting to be tapped; but no one in government is interested, as long as the Abuja allocation is guaranteed.

In Nigeria, people are killing themselves, while security officials remain aloof.


Magufuli reduced his cabinet size from 30 to 19; in Nigeria the figure is increasing. He rejected a $10 billion loan from China because the conditions attached to it are inimical to the progress of his country.

In Nigeria we are insatiably going after the Chinese loans, no matter the conditions attached to them; we cannot build railways without Chinese loans.

Magufuli was able to build railways, hydro power stations, LNG plants, bridges, wind farm projects, gold refinery plant, expanded park projects, executed free education for public schools, and many more, without collecting any foreign loan.


He called the bluffs of super powers, Britain and China; all he did to move the country forward was to block the drain pipes and tapped on the potentials in the country.

He stood alone and fearless against the forces of darkness; he sacrificed self for Tanzania; he banned all illicit and explicit videos from Tanzania online space; and despite all of these, he made his Tanzania a middle income country.

Unfortunately, while he was doing these things, no African leader openly supported him; I guess for fear of losing on their loan deals and others.

I really wish that the African continent can have more Magufulis, so that in no distant time, we will be able to contest with the best in the world.

Our leadership must wake up. Professor Lumumba calls it the “magulification of Africa”; that is, to bring political hygiene into governance in Africa.

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“Bandits won’t surrender if they don’t feel safe” – Sheikh Gumi proposes amnesty for bandits

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Islamic cleric, Ahmad Gumi has said bandits will not let go of their arms if they are not assured of their safety and rehabilitation.

Gumi said this on Wednesday, March 24, during a virtual event hosted by the National Institute for Legislative and Democratic Studies.

 

The meeting was organised to discuss Nigeria’s security challenges.

 

Speaking, the cleric said he sees no reason why the government should not dialogue with the bandits who are willing to negotiate.

 

He said: “Nobody can justify criminality, what we are saying is what we saw in the forest is an ethnic war going on between people in the forest and the neighboring villages and hamlets. When the herder felt he has grievances and nobody was listening to him, he took on weapons.

 

“So when we went there and they saw a listening ear, they were ready to negotiate, tell us their grievances, and ready to incorporate into the society.  So in such a case, I see no reason why we should not have a dialogue with them.”

 

According to The Cable, the cleric added that if they are not shown that they’ll be safe when reintegrated into the society, they will continue to carry arms.

 

The cleric further stated that they should be given amnesty the same way the Niger Delta militants were granted amnesty.

 

He said: “Looking at their educational status, they don’t have any official or unofficial education. How can a nation which is serious about security leave a chunk of its society so uneducated, leave it to arms and drugs? I don’t think that society is serious. How can we disperse them, rehabilitate them because they are holding arms to protect themselves.

“If you don’t show them they’re safe in the larger society, there’s no way they can leave their weapon. And that’s why we asked for amnesty for them just like we had in the Niger Delta.

 

“I’m not justifying their kidnapping, what they do is crime. But their kidnapping is to get more money to buy more weapons so that they can protect themselves.”

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